Artemigrante 2016

17° Festival di Circo Contemporaneo e Teatro di Strada

17° Festival di Circo Contemporaneo e Teatro di Strada

Sibillini Mountains

Sibillini Mountains in Black & White.
A small part of my photos of the National Park.

The Sibillini Mountains, are a mountain group in Italy, part of the central Apennines. Situated between eastern Umbria and the Marche, they are mostly composed of limestone rocks, formed in the Mesozoic and Cenozoic (100 to 50 million years ago) on the bottom of an extinct sea. The land emerged 20 million years ago. Most of the peaks are over 2,000 m (6,600 ft); the highest altitude is reached by Monte Vettore at 2,476 m (8,123 ft).

Since 1993 the area has been part of the Parco Nazionale dei Monti Sibillini (Sibillini Mountains National Park).

Le Havre, UNESCO World Heritage Site

UNESCO declared the city centre of Le Havre a World Heritage Site on 15 July 2005 honouring the “innovative utilisation of concrete’s potential”. The 133-hectare space that represented, according to UNESCO, “an exceptional example of architecture and town planning of the post-war era,” is one of the rare contemporary World Heritage Sites in Europe.

Le Havre is an urban French commune and city in the Seine-Maritime department in the Normandy region of northwestern France. It is situated on the right bank of the estuary of the river Seine on the Channel southwest of the Pays de Caux.

In the Second World War, German forces occupied Le Havre from the spring of 1940 causing an exodus of its population. Le Havre suffered 132 bombings by the Allies during the war. The Nazis also destroyed the port infrastructure and sank ships before leaving the city. The greatest destruction, however, occurred on 5 and 6 September 1944 when the British Royal Air Force bombed the city centre and the port to weaken the occupier under Operation Astonia – often described as the storm of iron and fire.

The results of the bombing campaign were appalling: 5,000 deaths (including 1,770 in 1944), 75,000 to 80,000 injured, 150 hectares of land razed, 12,500 buildings destroyed. The port was also devastated and some 350 wrecks lie at the bottom of the sea.Le Havre was liberated by Allied troops on 12 September 1944.

In spring 1945, Raoul Dautry of the Ministry of Reconstruction and Urban Development entrusted the project to rebuild the city of Le Havre to Auguste Perret. Perret wanted to make a clean sweep of the old structures and apply the theories of structural classicism. The material to be used for the building construction was concrete and the general plan was an orthogonal frame. Officially, the reconstruction was completed in the mid-1960s.

UNESCO declared the city centre of Le Havre a World Heritage Site on 15 July 2005 honouring the “innovative utilisation of concrete’s potential”. The 133-hectare space that represented, according to UNESCO, “an exceptional example of architecture and town planning of the post-war era,” is one of the rare contemporary World Heritage Sites in Europe.

One of the most important monument is St. Joseph’s Church

It is a Roman Catholic church, built between 1951 and 1957/58 as part of the reconstruction of the town of Le Havre, which was entirely destroyed by the British during World War II. It acts as a memorial to the five thousand civilians who died in the conflict.

The church was designed by the chief architect for the reconstruction of Le Havre, Auguste Perret, teacher and mentor to the Swiss architect Le Corbusier. The sombre interior is in the Neo-Gothic style. The tower is 107 metres tall and acts as a beacon visible from out at sea, especially at night when illuminated.

© Zallocco Emanuele
All my photographic images are copyright. All rights are reserved. Do not use, post links to blog or web, copy or edit any of my images without my permission.
Text and information on Wikipedia and on the www.lehavretourisme.com

Notte dell’Opera 2016

Notte dell’Opera is Festival in Macerata (Marche – Italy)

Flowering of Castelluccio

The blooming occurs mainly between May and July. The Flowering it is a succession of blossomings of different species: daffodils, poppies, violets, gentianellas, lentils and many others.

Castelluccio di Norcia is a small village, that lies in the “Parco nazionale dei Monti Sibillini” in the Umbria region, and with its 1400 metres above the sea is one of the highest in the Appennini. The historical centre is placed on the top of a hill, in the middle of a tableland bearing the same name, very wide, where the famous lentils are coltivated.
It is the blooming of the latter, with other kind of flowers, that offer between the end of May and the beginning of June a truly unique sight.

The blooming occurs mainly between May and July, but there is not a precise period because it all depends on the climate conditions. There is not even a peak, but it is a succession of blossomings of different species: daffodils, poppies, violets, gentianellas, lentils and many others. My advice is to check the blooming on the official website http://www.castellucciodinorcia.it .
If possible avoid Sundays, because the place is packed with tourists, almost unlivable I would say!

© Zallocco Emanuele
All my photographic images are copyright. All rights are reserved. Do not use, post links to blog or web, copy or edit any of my images without my permission.

Summer Solstice in Ancona

The Summer Solstice in Ancona (Marche Region-Italy) is an important day, because it is possible to admire the sunset on the Adriatic Sea.

On the 21st of June, in Ancona, from San Ciriaco Cathedral it is possible to see the sunrise and sunset on the Adriatic Sea.

Winter in Castelluccio

A picturesque village – where only 12 people live during the winter – is transformed as the sun sets and it is lit by lamps. Castelluccio di Norcia, in the Monti Sibillini National Park, in Italy, is nestled between mountains including Redentore, the second highest peak in the park, standing at 2,400m.

A picturesque village – where only 12 people live during the winter – is transformed as the sun sets and it is lit by lamps. Castelluccio di Norcia, in the Monti Sibillini National Park, in Italy, is nestled between mountains including Redentore, the second highest peak in the park, standing at 2,400m.

Thanks to the 1m thick snow, the landscape is transformed as the sun begins to set. Redentore, the mountain behind the village, is coloured orange, yellow, pink and bright white as the sun sets.